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Get to know Tim Hudson: Career timeline

Nov 18, 2013, 5:23 PM PST

AP

Tim Hudson spent the first six seasons of his big league career in the Bay Area with the Oakland Athletics. He will be back for a couple more after agreeing to sign a two-year deal with the San Francisco Giants.

Hudson, 38, is a three-time All-Star with 205 wins and a career 3.44 ERA. He won 92 games in six seasons with the A’s and 113 in nine season with the Atlanta Braves.

For those unfamiliar with “Huddy,” here’s a look at his career timeline:  

June 8, 1999 – Hudson’s Big league debut: Hudson was drafted in the sixth round of the 1997 MLB draft. He was considered under-sized and there were questions about his velocity. In other words, he was just the Oakland Athletics’ type. The A’s rookie made his debut on June 8, 1999, against the San Diego Padres. He struck out 11 batters and allowed just four earned runs. He finished his rookie season 11-2 with a 3.23 ERA.

October 11, 2001 – Eight shutout innings against the Yankees in ALDS Game 2: The New York Yankees were heavy favorites, but the upstart A’s had the pitching. In what still remains as the finest postseason start of his career, Hudson tossed eight shutout innings against the Bronx Bombers. The Yankees won the series in five games.

September 4, 2002 – A’s win 20th consecutive game: Seeking baseball history against the Kansas City Royals, the A’s had their ace on the mound. Oakland jumped out to an 11-run lead, but Hudson allowed five runs and left the game in the seventh inning. The Royals rallied to tie the game at 11, before Scott Hatteberg hit the walk-off home run that was later immortalized in Moneyball. 

August 11, 2003 – Two-hit shutout against the Red Sox: Hudson out-dueled Pedro Martinez to tie the Red Sox for the top spot in the American League Wild Card chase. It was easily one of the best performances of his career and it came against one of the toughest lineups in Major League Baseball at the time. The A’s ended up winning the American League West.

October 7, 2003 – Hudson injured in ALDS Game 4 against the Red Sox: After seemingly exaggerated rumors of his involvement in a bar fight the night before the game, Hudson was removed from his start after just one inning pitched. The A’s ended up losing the game and eventually the series.

December 17, 2004 – Hudson traded to the Braves: In one of the worst trades of A’s general manager Billy Beane’s tenure, Hudson was shipped to the Braves in exchange for outfielder Charles Thomas and pitchers Juan Cruz and Dan Meyer. 

August 8, 2008 – Hudson undergoes Tommy John surgery: Hudson missed more than a year after going under the knife of Dr. James Andrews. He returned in September of 2009, but truly regained his form in 2010, when he went 17-9 with a 2.83 en route to winning the National League Comeback Player of the Year award.

April 30, 2013 – Wins 200th game and hits a home run: Hudson became just the 110th pitcher to win 200 games by defeating Gio Gonzalez and the Washington Nationals. Hudson helped his cause by clubbing a home run off Zach Duke.

July 24, 2013 – Gruesome right ankle injury:  Hudson was dispatching the New York Mets with ease. The Braves had a 6-0 lead when Hudson went to cover first base on a grounder in the eighth inning. While attempting to beat the throw, Eric Young Jr. accidentally stepped on Hudson’s ankle, forcing it to bend in a very unnatural and disturbing way. The fractured right ankle cost Hudson the remainder of the 2013 season.

November 7, 2013 – Screws removed from right ankle: After spending several months rehabbing his injured right ankle, Hudson got the screws removed. His wife, Kim, provided the update.

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